A houseyard drought.

When you think of drought, most often the mental image is of a farmer struggling with his brown and dry crops, or sick thin and starving cattle.
But what about the houseyard? For a lot of farmers their home is their haven, and our home is no less true of the fact.
Mum is an amazing gardener, and we have become almost selfsufficient by virtue of her green thumbs.
A massive vegetable garden and a fruit orchard filled with produce just for our family, and with enough left over to share around.
Then drought hits, the first thing we do is stop watering the lawn, it dies, and becomes brown and hard, next the orchard, and finally the vege garden is dead. Flowers? What flowers? Our rose garden is long gone these days.

Now this whole subject coming from me-a person whose thumbs are not only not green, but I can wilt a plant just by looking at it? I love our garden, I love the way mum can grow things out of a patch of bare dirt, and I hate to see her sad now that the garden is gone. We got 4 inches of rain in March, and for too many people came the assumption that the drought is ‘over’ for us. And for a few short months it has been ‘ok’ in that we haven’t had to cart as much water or work quite as hard to feed starving cattle.
But for my Mum and her gorgeous garden? Its going to take a lot longer to grow back the wonders that were before. Perhaps if we can change the idea of drought from something a short shower of rain will fix, to a mental image more like a garden, the world might just have a better idea of how long it takes to recover from the devastation, just as a lawn cannot survive on a single watering, neither can a crop, or fodder for cattle. And just as our fruit trees are going to take years to recover from the dry before they produce again, so will all farming methods take years to recover from what is proving to be a very nasty ongoing disaster.
Whatever kind of garden you grow-large or small, I hope it is getting the rain it needs to grow and be gorgeous!!

20140730-184613-67573165.jpg